Caprifoliaceae: Honeysuckle Family

Hairy Honeysuckle – Lonicera hispidula

Blooms:

Apr–July

Plant Height:

Stem up to 6 m

Flower Size:

Medium

Origin:

Native

Habitat:

Along streams, wooded and dry slopes & ridges

Notes:

A common shrub with long climbing and twining branches, this has pink flowers which go on to produce bright red berries in late summer to fall. The hairiness in the plant’s name reflects the hairs on the flowers themselves, not on the leaves which may be either hairy or glabrous.  The upper leaves are fused around the stem, the lower leaves have prominent leaf-like stipules.

Chaparral Honeysuckle – Lonicera interrupta

Blooms:

Apr–May

Plant Height:

Stems 30 cm

Flower Size:

Small-medium

Origin:

Native

Habitat:

Dry slopes & ridges

Notes:

Much less common than Hairy Honeysuckle (Lonicera hispidula, see abive).  A shrub with climbing to sprawling branches, this has yellow flowers, is almost hairless and lacks stipules on the lower leaves.  The upper 1–3 pairs of leaves are fused around the stem.  Fruits are similar to Hairy Honeysuckle, clear red berries about 1 cm in diameter, ripening on late summer to fall.

Black Twinberry – Lonicera involucrata var. ledebourii

Blooms:

Apr–June

Plant Height:

0.6–3 m

Flower Size:

Medium

Origin:

Native

Habitat:

Moist areas near coast

Notes:

An erect, large shrub with distinctive paired tubular flowers, reddish-orange with flared yellow tips.  Each flower has a persistent orange-red, leaf-like bract.  When the black berries have formed, the bracts become enlarged and turn deep red or purple, forming an attractive collar below the fruits.  The leaves are glandular, opposite and sparsely hairy, elliptic to ovate in shape.

Common Snowberry – Symphoricarpos albus var. laevigatus

Blooms:

May–July

Plant Height:

60–180 cm

Flower Size:

Small clusters

Origin:

Native

Habitat:

Shaded canyons & slopes

Notes:

This is a common, straggly shrub with clusters of 8–16 inconspicuous, pink, bell-shaped flowers.  They form small, white, poisonous berries, which remain on the bush throughout much of the following winter.  The inside of the berries resembles snow, providing an extra justification for the common name.  Leaves are elliptic to round.

Creeping Snowberry – Symphoricarpos mollis

Blooms:

Apr–May

Plant Height:

15–60 cm

Flower Size:

Small clusters

Origin:

Native

Habitat:

Open woods & brush

Notes:

Leaves and flowers are very similar to Common Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus, see above).  The flowers are in smaller clusters, with only 2–8 flowers, and the whole plant has a lower, more sprawling growth habit.